How do I become more fertile?

Fertility preservation is one of the most important areas of health you need to focus on now ready or not.

If you are reading this you maybe at the beginning of your fertility journey, about to start or looking for some answers about how fertile you are. Perhaps you are considering being off birth control, investigating egg freezing and have read about young women finding out their egg reserve is low and are basically in menopause.

With regard to becoming more fertile, it is something to consider though you may not be thinking about having children now … what you do now will impact your success later on. Maybe you are focused on your career or figuring out a relationship, maybe you don’t even have a significant other so fertility is something way off your radar and in the future.

Both females and males don’t really consider their fertility as something connected to their health and their future reproductive success; awareness only comes up when they are “trying to conceive”.

Fertility has come to the forefront with egg freezing becoming routine with young women; many women have found they have low amh also know as low egg reserve and companies like Facebook have taken note of the need to preserve fertility. Facebook’s fertility policy offer these benefits, and what is important to know about egg freezing is that egg quality is more important than egg quantity.

It’s important to think about your fertility health early on and take steps that naturally will enhance your fertility.

It’s important to think about your fertility health early on and take steps that naturally will enhance your fertility.

According to a recent article in the Health section of the NYTimes paternal health plays a major role in the health of not just the child but the pregnancy. “ the need for everyone of reproductive age — future fathers and mothers alike — to adopt healthy lifestyles that can “pay off in a number of ways, not just in having a healthy pregnancy but also in preventing chronic disease”. (https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/25/well/family/the-risks-to-babies-of-older-fathers.html)